DIY SOS

Earlier this year we visited the house in Bromsgrove to photograph the Stiltz homelift installation. Until last night all our pictures were under BBC embargo, but now the programme has aired we can finally show them. 28 year old Karis was diagnosed with cerebral palsy as a baby. She still lived with her mum Karen, who’s own health was deteriorating and was making caring for Karis almost impossible. Older sister Jo was desperate to give Karis a new home, but her house was wholly inaccessible as the doors and corridors were too narrow for a wheelchair and there was no easy access to upstairs. To avoid Karis having to go into a residential home Jo’s house had to be completely remodelled by Nick Knowles and the team. Needless to say Karis and her family were absolute joy to work with and it was a pleasure to see how the DIY SOS project – and in particular the Stiltz homelift – has changed the family’s life.

Adult Cerebral Palsy Hub founder gets a lift

The one great thing about this job is you get to meet some really interesting people.

Last week we were in Barnet photographing a 42-year-old Londoner who is launching her own charity, the Adult Cerebral Palsy Hub, as she is concerned that many adults suffering from the disorder have little or no support network. Emma learned to live with CP from a young age but was recently diagnosed with hip dysplasia. Following a hip replacement and reconstruction getting up and down stairs became a problem, but not wishing to move to a bungalow with three children, she and her husband decided to have a Stiltz Homelift installed, which in her words “has transformed my life”.